Play at plate elicits strategy, if not challenge

Play at plate elicits strategy, if not challenge

MIAMI -- Plays at home plate will be closely watched now that Major League Baseball has changed its rule on collisions.

One play in particular could have turned controversial in Miami's 4-3 win over the Rockies on Tuesday night. In the second inning, Garrett Jones was able to slide home safely after Troy Tulowitzki's relay throw wasn't handled by catcher Wilin Rosario.

But as Jones ran toward home, manager Mike Redmond was prepared to argue, with the contention that Rosario was blocking the plate without the ball. In the Marlins' judgment, Jones would have been denied a lane to slide.

"I would have gone out there for that, absolutely," Redmond said. "It just looked like a normal play on any normal year where he was blocking the plate and was going to catch the ball and get the guy out. He would have slid into him.

"He was definitely, in my opinion, blocking the plate without the ball."

Because of the rule change, runners can no longer barrel over catchers. But the catcher must leave an opening for the runner. If not, the runner can attempt to dislodge the ball without sliding.

Joe Frisaro is a reporter for MLB.com. He writes a blog, called The Fish Pond. Follow him on Twitter