CLOSE

Now Commenting On:

Reyes doesn't change, hit streak reaches 23 games

Reyes doesn't change, hit streak reaches 23 games

Reyes doesn't change, hit streak reaches 23 games
WASHINGTON -- Employing all aspects of his game helped Jose Reyes establish his career-high hitting streak.

Reyes delivered a two-out double in the third inning on Saturday night to extend his streak to 23 games. It's the longest active streak and is tied for the longest one in the Majors this season.

On Friday night, the Marlins' shortstop relied on his speed.

More

Reyes extended his streak to 22 games by collecting bunt singles in the first innings of both games of a doubleheader at Nationals Park. Each time, the bunt was used as an element of surprise, as Reyes caught Washington third baseman Ryan Zimmerman playing back.

For the season, Reyes has seven bunt singles, one shy of Emilio Bonifacio's team lead.

"When we put him batting third," manager Ozzie Guillen said, "I told him, 'Don't change your game. You're not an RBI guy. You're not a power guy. Just play the way you play. Don't change anything for us. If you need to bunt, you bunt. If you have to move a guy over, move him over.'

"That's what he's doing now, he's swinging the bat well. That's part of his game, bunting. I hope he continues to do that. That's a huge weapon for him, and for us. We're going to need him on base."

The string began on July 13, Miami's first game after the All-Star break, and he's batting .363 (33-for-91) with a .394 on-base percentage in the 23 games.

Reyes is the seventh player in Marlins history to hit safely in at least 20 consecutive games. The franchise record is 35, set by Luis Castillo in 2002.

A year ago, Bonifacio hit safely in 26 straight, which is the club's second-highest total. Kevin Millar reached 25 games in 2002. The others were Edgar Renteria (1996) and Castillo (1999), who each finished at 22 games. And, in 1996, Greg Colbrunn hit in 21 in a row.

Reyes' previous career high was 20 games, set in 2005 while he was with the Mets.

Joe Frisaro is a reporter for MLB.com. He writes a blog, called The Fish Pond. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Less