Replay gives LoMo his first pinch-hit homer

Replay gives LoMo his first pinch-hit homer

Replay gives LoMo his first pinch-hit homer
MIAMI -- Logan Morrison took a few minutes to circle the bases on his first career pinch-hit home run.

The delay was attributed to the shot being subjected to an overturned replay review in the seventh inning of the Marlins' 5-3 win over the Cardinals at Marlins Park.

In the seventh inning on Wednesday, Morrison ripped a liner to right field off left-hander Sam Freeman. The ball bounced off the top of the padding on the wall, struck a railing and came back onto the field.

Initially, Morrison held up for a double, as no home run ruling was called.

"I thought it was out," Morrison said.

Morrison said he was scared when he saw third-base coach Joe Espada pointing to return to second base.

"I was like, 'I might get thrown out here,'" Morrison said. "I thought I hit it out. ... I knew I got it well, but at this park, you never know, with the high fence and everything else."

Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen asked crew chief Jerry Layne for a review. The umpires huddled, and headed off the field to check the review.

After a short delay, the umpires returned to the field and determined the ball was indeed a home run. The run became the game-winner for Miami.

From the dugout, Guillen saw the ball clear the wall, and he was confident the double would be overturned.

"Yeah, I know," Guillen said. "As soon as he hit it, I knew that ball hit the back of the rail. Thank God, we have instant replay, because now it was going to be a double. That helped a lot. It also helps the umpires."

That's quicker than arguing for three hours.

Morrison's home run was his eighth off the season.

The Marlins hit back-to-back homers in the inning. John Buck went deep off Fernando Salas. The Cardinals made a pitching change, and used the left-handed Freeman for Morrison.

It was the second review ever at Marlins Park.

On June 7, Giancarlo Stanton had a home run declared by replay on a drive also to right field.

Joe Frisaro is a reporter for MLB.com. He writes a blog, called The Fish Pond. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.